How To Wear A Three Piece Suit Outfit Inspiration For Men

How To Wear A Three Piece Suit Outfit Inspiration For Men

There's an undeniable allure to things that come in threes. Consider the legendary Musketeers, the timeless Bee Gees, and the iconic Marx brothers. This principle extends to the realm of fashion as well, particularly in the world of tailored elegance. It's time to rekindle your appreciation for the three-piece suit. No longer confined to the flamboyant displays of Pitti Uomo peacocks or the discerning Milanese trendsetters, this classic ensemble is making its way into the everyday gentleman's wardrobe.

Yet, as with any sophisticated outfit, mastering the three-piece suit demands careful attention to detail. While fabric, cut, and color are essential components, there's an art to getting them just right. Drawing upon the insights of Jack Liang, the Melbourne-based tailor extraordinaire and co-founder of Trunk Tailors, along with Christina Exie, the in-house suit designer at Rhodes & Beckett, we delve into the nuances of this sartorial masterpiece.

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Elevating Your Look Through Fabric Selection

As the seasons shift, so too should the fabric of your suit. Summer calls for fabrics that embody comfort, breathability, and versatility, ensuring you remain unruffled even in the face of soaring temperatures. In this context, consider the crisp charm of fresco fabric.

"Fresco," Liang affirms, "exudes a cool and unwrinkled sophistication. Crafted from high-twist yarns, it's tailored to conquer the Australian climate." Heeding his advice, you might want to explore J&J Minnis' revered Fresco II collection.

Conversely, when winter's chill descends, textures take center stage. "Flannel is a wise choice," Liang suggests. But opt for a lightweight iteration to add character without compromising comfort. His recommendation? Fox Brothers' Queen's Award flannel, a mere 250 grams in weight, which clinched the Queen's Award for Industry in 2006. This feather-light fabric is a perfect match for the three-piece suit.

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Nailing the Perfect Fit

Given the three-piece suit's inherent formality, a tailored fit is key. The suit's shoulders should align with your own, allowing a hand to effortlessly slip beneath the lapels once the jacket is buttoned. However, moderation is key; the jacket shouldn't be too slim. Liang emphasizes that the jacket's cut should accommodate comfortable buttoning when paired with the waistcoat.

"It's not uncommon to spot a well-fitted waistcoat accompanied by a jacket that resists fastening," Liang points out. An oversight that can be avoided with the right approach.

Turning to the pants, a hem that rests between a half break and no break at all strikes the perfect modern note. Exie, with her flair for style, chimes in, suggesting a cuffed hem for that extra touch of contemporary sophistication.

1PA1 Men's 3 Pieces Slim Fit Linen Suit Set - Two Button Jacket, Vest & Pants 

 

A Palette of Subdued Elegance

Unlike its two-piece counterpart, which revels in a kaleidoscope of colors and patterns, the three-piece suit gravitates toward a palette of neutrals and muted shades. Liang underscores this point, highlighting the inherent dressiness of the three-piece ensemble.

"For a solid foundation," he advises, "consider beginning with navy, charcoal, or light grey." But don't shy away from patterns. Exie encourages the daring by proposing a mid-grey prince of wales check for a bolder statement, or the shadow check for a more understated black-on-black pattern.

 

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The Art of Harmonious Mixing

Perhaps you've entertained the thought of incorporating a waistcoat of different color or pattern, and you're in luck-it's entirely feasible, but with a caveat. Liang offers a word of caution, noting that mixing and matching components of a three-piece suit demands a careful touch.

A purist at heart, Exie adheres to the notion that a three-piece suit is best worn as a complete unit, discouraging separation. "Disassembling a three-piece suit," she contends, "alters its essence, transforming it into an amalgamation of separate elements."

For a more casual approach, Exie advocates omission over separation. "To maintain a casual air, pair the waistcoat and pants with a crisp white shirt, sleeves casually rolled up, and a tie," she suggests.

Intriguingly, Liang offers an alternative twist by suggesting the replacement of the waistcoat with knits or a vest as the "meat piece" in your sartorial sandwich. He proposes experimenting with contrasting color cardigans in cashmere or wool, or introducing an olive army gilet for a touch of contemporary flair.

 

Navigating the Rules of Waistcoat Elegance

Given its close proximity to the body, the waistcoat should prioritize comfort. It should extend to cover the belt area of your pants while maintaining a harmonious connection with no visible gap between itself and the trousers.

"Seamless alignment between the waistcoat and trousers is vital," asserts Jack, emphasizing the importance of a harmonious appearance.

Enhancing the fit is possible through the rear cinch, which allows for subtle adjustments. The waistcoat's buttons should generally remain fastened, except for the last button. Additionally, the top button of the jacket should remain secured, with the second button left unfastened, a practice endorsed by Exie.

 

Mastering the Art of Wearing the Three-Piece Suit

A quintessential three-piece suit, comprising the jacket, trouser, and matching waistcoat, stands as the pinnacle of black-tie elegance, straddling the space between the traditional two-piece and the suave tuxedo.

"As the occasion grows more formal," Liang notes, "the three-piece suit becomes an effortless choice." It's equally suited for social gatherings such as spring races and weddings, as pointed out by Exie.

Styling this ensemble demands an understanding of color harmony. Exie suggests pairing it with a softly hued oxford or twill shirt in shades of pink, blue, or grey. For those willing to embrace a bolder statement, she recommends vivid tones in luxurious twill stripes or micro-woven patterns.

For daytime affairs, consider lightening both color and fabric. "A cotton three-piece," Liang muses, "is an impeccable choice for a garden party, perfectly complemented by a knit tie." Alessandro Squarzi's expert execution of this approach serves as an inspiring example.

However, exercise caution when integrating this dapper ensemble into your professional sphere. As Liang humorously quips, it might be best to reserve this look for those who've truly "earned their stripes."

 

Navigating the Style Dos and Don'ts

  • Belt Versatility:Embrace the contemporary elegance of a belt-free look for a clean finish, except for formal events that warrant its presence.
  • Shirt Selection: Steer clear of audacious patterns or overly bold colors for shirts. Exie's advice? "Avoid audacious florals and gingham checks."
  • Tie Cohesion: Choose a tie that either matches your suit's base color or harmonizes with the highlight hue of your shirt. Exie illustrates, "If your suit is charcoal and your shirt boasts a purple highlight, opt for a purple block-colored tie."
  • Elevated Waistlines:Select higher-waisted pants to preserve the ensemble's proportion. An imperative for maintaining the harmony between trousers and waistcoat, ensuring a comfortable fit that doesn't strain or stretch.
  • Lapel Width: Opt for a wider lapel to accentuate the sculpted waist while providing visual balance with the jacket's shoulder width.
  • Personalization Through Accessories: Personalization reigns supreme, thanks to accessories like pocket squares and timepieces. Delve into items that offer a fresh take on tradition. Exie's intriguing suggestion? Consider a pocket watch in lieu of a wristwatch, offering an elegant twist.
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